How to Create Amazing Amazon Listings: Part 1 – Amazon Photo Best Practices

Creating an Amazon Listing that generates sales and builds a brand takes a lot of work.
You have to have titles optimized, copy in place for title and descriptions, backend keywords added, clear photos, and much more.

Today, we’re going to talk about optimizing our photos to ensure that we catch the eyes of customers and convert as many clicks into sales as possible.
Amazon has a strict policy when it comes to photos. You can view their guidelines here.

In order to accommodate Amazon rules, MyAmazonGuy has created best practices that you can follow that also helps you optimize your photos.

– MAIN/HERO Image has to be on a pure white background (255, 255, 255). Your photo may get rejected by Amazon if it doesn’t. It will also look much cleaner if you do it in Amazon’s uniform and desired manner.
Example of a pure white background:

Example of an invalid HERO image with a non-pure white background. Amazon would reject this HERO image:

– All photos should be in focus. Out-of-focus pictures tend to show a lack of professionalism to customers.
Example of an in-focus photo:

Example of a photo not in-focus. Amazon would reject this image:

– Dimensions matter. Customers will be using different devices to view your photos, so you want to use a larger (in terms of dimensions) photo to show up clearly despite their device. For this reason, you want to have each photo (MAIN/HERO and secondary) be at a resolution of 2000 x 2000 pixels. If you cannot do this, the bare minimum is 1000 x 1000. Photos can be easily shrunk down without much of a loss in quality, but being expanded destroys the quality of an image.
Example of a properly-sized photo:

Example of a photo with too small of dimensions. Notice how the quality is lost as it is expanded to fill the screen:

– Amazon often changes its guidelines for photos. It recently came out with a rule against “People in the main image/product on model with the exception of adult apparel.” This means that you cannot have any people in a HERO shot.
Example of a proper HERO photo without someone:

Example of an invalid HERO photo with a model in the picture. Amazon would reject this HERO image:

– Another rule that was recently instituted was “Text, logos, borders, color blocks, watermarks, or other graphics over the top of a product or in the background.” This means that you cannot have any text or logos in your HERO shot. This photo would be rejected by Amazon:
Example of a proper HERO photo without texts:

Example of an invalid HERO photo with text. Amazon would reject this HERO image:

– Secondary photos boost the conversion rate significantly. You should have 3-5 secondary photos that complement your product. Here are some ideas for those secondary photos:
+ Help your customers see the item in action. If you are selling shampoo, have lifestyle photos of someone washing your hair with the shampoo. If you are selling a table, have lifestyle photos of a family playing games on the table.
Examples of lifestyle photos. Notice how these utilize a product and a human to have the customer visualize themselves with the product:

+ Additional angles of the product can help give the customers the feeling like they’re seeing it in person. For any product that is to be worn on the body, additional angles can help a customer decide if they like the look of the product.
Example of different-angled photos. Notice how the different angles can help the customer imagine what this product would look like up close:

+ Include a group photo of your product line. This increases brand awareness.
Example of a good group photo. This type of photo can also assist in helping the product find other of your products that they may want to purchase:

+ Use infographics to explain key differences between your product and a competitor’s product.
Example of good infographics. These catch eyes and give helpful tips to the customer:

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